Great Links & Resources


An exciting new look to a valuable resource from the State Library of North Carolina

End of year gift for fans of North Carolina history, heritage and culture: NCpedia’s new website goes live today!

Greetings old friends of North Carolina’s online encyclopedia, the NCpedia — and new and future friends too!

The new and improved NCpedia! December 2016.

The new and improved NCpedia! December 2016.

After several months of planning, design, programming and testing, NCpedia now has a brand new and updated user interface as of this morning. Same great content — no change there — but with an entirely new look and feel and user experience.

The site traces its history back before the dawn of the web, to frequently asked questions and then brochures created by librarians at the State Library to answer those questions.

Eventually those questions found their way into HTML pages in the 1990s, and then they coalesced into an encyclopedic collection called the eNCyclopedia.  By 2009, the content had grown to several hundred pages — and the site needed to find a new home in a content management system that allowed for expansion, search and a better user experience. The encyclopedia got a new home in Drupal and a new name — and NCpedia was launched.

NCpedia before the reno!

NCpedia before the reno!

Since that time, the content has expanded by more than 26,000 entries, including more than 6,500 encyclopedia articles and the more than 20,000 record volume of the North Carolina Gazetteer (an annotated index of North Carolina place names).  And more than 7,400 images have been incorporated along with maps and interactive features like timelines.  By 2015, it was time for the home to get a reno!

NCpedia is still in Drupal — but the site has received an entire remodel to improve usability, search and find features, and the overall user experience.  We hope you like it!

And if you would like more information about the history of NCpedia, please visit the “About NCpedia” page on the website: http://www.ncpedia.org/about.  We’ve even included some snapshots of the early days and how far the digital encyclopedia has come.  Today the site includes more than 7,000 articles and more than 7,400 images and receives more than 4 million visits per year.

Check it out!

Kelly Agan, Digital Projects Librarian

The post End of year gift for fans of North Carolina history, heritage and culture: NCpedia’s new website goes live today! appeared first on GHL Blog.

We are pleased to announce that microfilmed issues of The Winston-Salem Chronicle are being digitized through a partnership with the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center (DigitalNC) and are now available online. With permission from the The Winston-Salem Chronicle, 15 microfilm reels were sent to DigitalNC for digitization this spring. Half of the collection was sent so that patrons would continue to have access to some newspaper back issues. The digitized editions cover 1974 through 1996 with the exception of 1988, due to an issue with the microfilm reel for that year. We will be sending the second round of reels to be digitized this fall. They will cover 1997 to 2014.

Chronicle 1st

Cover Page of First Issue, Sept. 5, 1974

The digital collection currently contains 1168 issues that  are conveniently organized by year and searchable in a calendar format.

Chronicle Calendar

Newspaper Search By Title, Then Date 1984 Selected For Calendar Date Display

Or you can browse the issues by thumbnail image. Click on the image to view the issue.  You can zoom in or out to view the issue, page back and forth through the issue, and view as text only or PDF. Also, you can use the “clip images” feature to save a page or generate a persistent link to the page. Please remember that The Winston-Salem Chronicle retains copyright for the newspaper’s content.

ChronicleIssues

View Issues By Date Range (“Show Only Front Pages” Option Checked)

The newspaper editions are keyword searchable. Keywords are highlighted. Spellings may change over time so it is important to use different spellings to aid your search results. For instance, using “theater” and “theatre” for this search.

NBTFOCR.JPG

National Black Theatre Festival article keyword search result.

We hope that you find accessing The Winston-Salem Chronicle online at DigitalNC useful for your research, information, and entertainment needs. The back issues from 1997 to the present are available on microfilm in the North Carolina Room.

 

A blog post from the Government and Heritage Library at the North Carolina State Library has some exciting news for genealogists:

 

Family Records: Quick Tips & 2,000+ new surnames added!

Posted: 03 Jul 2014 05:15 AM PDT

2,000+ new surnames added

We have exciting news for genealogists! We’ve made it even easier to find genealogical records in our online Family Records collection. 2,000+ new surnames have been added to the list of names on the Family Records website, bringing the list up to more than 3,500 names.

This list of names are a quick starting place for genealogists, but it’s certainly not the last place you should look! In fact, below are some tips to know before you use the list.

Family Records Quick Tips

  1. The Family Records collection contains genealogial materials from the State Library of North Carolina and State Archives of North Carolina – but it doesn’t contain all their online genealogical materials! The Family Records collection is one collection within the much larger North Carolina Digital Collections website. Several additional collections have resources of genealogical value:
  2. The Family Records collection includes six types of materials:
    • Bible Records,
    • a 6-volume index of marriage and death notices compiled from five North Carolina newspapers dating 1799 to 1893,
    • a small selection of genealogical books,
    • a growing collection of patron-donated reports (known as “vertical files),
    • WPA cemetery surveys from the 1960s,
    • and contemporary photographs of headstones in Raleigh Hebrew Cemetery & Hebrew section of Raleigh  Historic Oakwood Cemetery.
  3. The list of 3,500 surnames in the Family Records collection isn’t complete. It does not include all the surnames that appear in the Family Records collection. But, don’t let that deter you! If you don’t find the surname you’re looking for in the list, there are other ways to search for family names throughout all six types of materials in the Family Records Collection:
Type of material in Family Records Collection Surnames included in family name list? Surnames full text searchable? Surnames searchable in metadata? Alternative methods for finding surname
Bible Records Yes Some Bibles are full-text searchable, but not all. Yes
Marriage and Death Notices Partially Yes No
Genealogy books Partially Yes No
Vertical files (patron-donated genealogical reports) Yes Yes Yes
WPA cemetery surveys Partially Yes, but many typos, so you may not want to rely on full text searches. No Surveys are by county. Within counties, surnames are listed alphabetically.
Raleigh Hebrew Cemetery & Hebrew section of Raleigh Historic Oakwood Cemetery photos Yes Yes Yes

The post Family Records: Quick Tips & 2,000+ new surnames added! appeared first on GHL Blog.

Article in this week’s Winston-Salem Chronicle:

Yolanda

Branch manager Yolanda Bolden (r) and library assistant Alicia Clinton at the Malloy/Jordan branch. Click the image to see the story.

Another of my “things found while looking for other things” posts. This one in honor of Valentine week.

In the 1890s it was traditional for the University of North Carolina yearbook to publish writings of students, most of them anonymous, in the back of the book. Here is one from 1898. As usual, click the image for full size::

NCGirl1898

This is no threat to be taught in any college course, but it does remind us North Carolina guys of something that we have always known.

I note that we have had several hits recently on an old post about a free showing of two WW II documentaries at one of our branches. That post won’t be of much use to you now, but here is some information about those films that will:

Both films are available from Amazon.com, but you can also check them and many others out free from the Forsyth County Public Library. See how to do that below.

HowISurvived

“How I Survived World War II” is a 50 minute film featuring interviews with a number of Charlotte area war veterans. It was produced by the Charlotte Rotary Club and WTVI-TV in Charlotte.

IfTheyCouldSee

“If they could see us now, the story of Charlotte’s 38th Evacuation Hospital” is a 28 minute film about the extraordinary women and men who spent four years, three of those on the combat front, caring for wounded soldiers. The film was created by Chris Hudson.

The DVD also includes a Ken Burns promo (:31), a self promo (:31), deleted scenes (38:50) a radio interview w/Chris Hudson(4:20), and a magazine interview w/Chris Hudson (6:04)

Here is how to find them and over 500 other World War II films:

In your browser’s address bar, type forsyth.cc/library and hit return.

When the FCPL main page appears, click on “Search the Catalog”

When our new NC Cardinal catalog page appears, select “video” from the drop down menu at the left and type world war II into the box, then click “Search”. You do not need to make any other selections, such as “subject”…the “keyword” search will work fine.

You will be presented with 79 items currently held by the FCPL. Some of these are documentaries, others are theatrical films. You can browse through them or you can filter the results using the advanced search feature. Find the ones you like, click on hold, enter your information and you will soon have what you want.

FCPL copyClick image for full size

If you use the drop down menu to change the search from “Forsyth” to “Cardinal” (at the top of the list), then click “Search”, you will be presented with a list of 555 items held by our new statewide NC Cardinal consortium. Most of those can be checked out by using the same hold procedure. They will be delivered to your library of choice.

Cardinal copyClick image for full size

“The Monuments Men”, which will open in theaters Friday in conjunction with the Berlin International Film Festival, starring George Clooney, Matt Damon, Bill Murray, John Goodman and Cate Blanchett, is based on the true story of how a team of soldiers and scholars saved thousands of Nazi looted art treasures in the final months of World War II.

Webpage

Click the image to go to the website

The team faced a double-whammy of a problem…trying to ensure that the treasures were not deliberately destroyed by the desperate Nazis, while also ensuring that they were not accidentally destroyed by Allied bombing. They created hundreds of thousands of records documenting their effort, almost all of which are available under Looted Valuables in Fold3’s Holacaust-Era Assets Collection.

You can access the paysite Fold3 free via our link here: Fold3 free via FCPL

You will need a valid Forsyth County Public Library Card. Feel free to call us at 336-703-3070 if you have problems or questions. A few samples of the available documents:StoutCard

The personnel card for George Stout, who headed the project. He is played by George Clooney in the film.

film Ribbentrop

A note on General von Ribbentrop’s cache of stolen art

Masterpieces

Ceramics

Rembrandt copy

Bookplates

Picasso

BTW, they are still finding stuff stolen by the Nazis 70 years ago.

Additional info and pics:

The movie site says it is based on Robert Edsel’s The Monument Men, but he has written two other books on the same subject which almost certainly figure into the mix. He has also produced a documentary film, “The Rape of Europa”, and other items. See here: Robert M. Edsel

This pic from Edsel’s book Saving Italy shows German soldiers with Luca Signorelli’s “Crucifixion” and other works looted from the Uffizi in San Leonardo, Italy, August 13, 1944. Click on the pic for bigger view.

Signorelli copy

You can see more pics from Saving Italy here

Ilaria Dagnini Brey published The Venus Fixers, a look at the same story from a different perspective, in 2009. She is married to Carter Brey, the renowned cellist.

VenusFixers copy

Here is the link to her article published last month in “The Smithsonian”

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