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PAWilsonPort

When Forsyth County was created in 1849, only one person that we know of, lawyer Thomas J. Wilson, was living within the original boundaries of the town that would become known as Winston. One of the first to move there from elsewhere was Peter A. Wilson, a merchant tailor, who had been doing business in Germanton. Peter would become one of the legendary founders of the town, so much so that when he died in 1892, the newspapers uncharacteristically played the story big.

OldLandmarkGone

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Wilson was the second mayor of the town of Winston, serving from 1860-61 and a later term from 1882-83. He also served nine terms as a town commissioner, and one term each as a state representative from Forsyth and a state senator from Forsyth/Stokes Counties. In 1870, he and Hamilton Scales founded a small plug tobacco manufacturing operation, the first in the town of Winston. And, of course, his Wilson Hotel and “place of entertainment” became the best known establishment in the city.

PAWilsonMap1890s

Fourth & Liberty Streets, mid-1890s…Peter Wilson retired for health reasons in the late 1880s and his establishment at Liberty & Third was used in many ways afterward…in 1893, local newspapers reported that his old complex had been burned to the ground, which was not necessarily true…the owners were able to rebuild within the original brick central section…at the time of this photo, the buildings were being used once again as a tailor shop and residence, with the former hotel portion fronting on Liberty Street as the largest beer saloon in town…

Attention, Civil War History Buffs!

The Yadkin Valley Historical Association invites you to participate

in its 2015 Yadkin Valley History and Genealogy Fair and Conference

Theme: Stoneman’s Raid (March-April 1865) in the Yadkin Valley,

which includes the counties of Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Caldwell, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Iredell, Rockingham, Rowan, Stokes, Surry, Watauga, Wilkes, and Yadkin; and anyone who is interested.  This is a regional fair and conference and open to the public.

Saturday, August 15, 2015

8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Yadkinville United Methodist Church,

204 West Main Street, Yadkinville, NC 27055

Sponsored by the Yadkin Valley Historical Association, Inc., which regional historians organized in 2006.

Speakers include:

Chris Hartley, author, Stoneman’s Raid 1865, will discuss the purpose of Stoneman’s Raid and how well it succeeded

Ed and Sue Curtis, organizers, Salisbury Prison Symposium, will review the Salisbury Prison and its importance to the Raiders

Registration (includes 2015 membership in the YVHA, an exhibit table, speakers fees, and lunch) is $15 in advance and $20 at the door.  Send registration to the Yadkin Valley Historical Association, Inc., John Reynolds, Treasurer, 7618 Rolling Oak Ct., Clemmons, NC  27012.  Make check payable to “YVHA”. or online at:

www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncyadvha/

Forsyth County Genealogical Society meets Tues., Aug. 4, 2015 at Forsyth County Public Library-Reynolda Manor Branch, 2839 Fairlawn Dr., Winston-Salem 27106.  Social at 6:30 PM; Program at 7:00.

Larry W. Cates, genealogist and history librarian at High Point Public Library, will present a lecture “The Law of the Land: How Court Cases Regarding Land Can Enrich Your Genealogy.”  Of all the record categories that exist, court cases are often the most neglected and the most informative. There are few other sources that will actually allow us to hear the voices of our ancestors. Only a time machine could bring us closer to them. In this follow-up to his July program, Mr. Cates will cover several typical legal actions related to land use and ownership in North Carolina courts. These include probate matters, ejectments, boundary disputes, caveats, civil actions concerning land, trespass cases, executions on land, and equity cases.  His talk is peppered with concrete examples from his own North Carolina-based research.  He will enlighten us about the different documents associated with each legal action, and the wealth of very personal information such cases sometimes reveal about our ancestors.

Forsyth County Genealogical Society meets Tues., Aug. 4, 2015 at Forsyth County Public Library-Reynolda Manor Branch, 2839 Fairlawn Dr., Winston-Salem 27106.  Social at 6:30 PM; Program at 7:00.

Larry W. Cates, genealogist and history librarian at High Point Public Library, will present a lecture “The Law of the Land: How Court Cases Regarding Land Can Enrich Your Genealogy.”  Of all the record categories that exist, court cases are often the most neglected and the most informative. There are few other sources that will actually allow us to hear the voices of our ancestors. Only a time machine could bring us closer to them. In this follow-up to his July program, Mr. Cates will cover several typical legal actions related to land use and ownership in North Carolina courts. These include probate matters, ejectments, boundary disputes, caveats, civil actions concerning land, trespass cases, executions on land, and equity cases.  His talk is peppered with concrete examples from his own North Carolina-based research.  He will enlighten us about the different documents associated with each legal action, and the wealth of very personal information such cases sometimes reveal about our ancestors.

FCGS Logo - tighter cut

FCGS Logo - tighter cut

FCGS meets Tuesday, July 7, 2015 at Forsyth County Public Library-Reynolda Manor Branch (auditorium), 2839 Fairlawn Dr., Winston-Salem, NC 27106; 6:30 PM Social, 7:00 PM program

Program title:  FOLLOW THE LAND, FIND THE LINEAGE

In North America, British colonists created for the first time a society in which land ownership was possible for many ordinary people.  Their descendants have inherited the blessings of that system, even in the realm of family history. When ancestors owned land, genealogists find it much easier to locate and connect generations. Yet, few genealogists take full advantage of reams of documentation generated by land ownership.  Larry W. Cates  will introduce participants to basic aspects of land-related sources including state and federal land grants, title deeds, deeds of trust, and land litigation. He will explore how land was conveyed and how and when these instruments were recorded with a particular emphasis on North Carolina research.  He will also discuss how these records can be analyzed fully to uncover potential family connections.

Larry W. Cates has been a genealogy and local history librarian at the Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library for nearly eight years. He began his family history research in 1989 and has since involved himself professional research and writing. He was editor of the Journal of the Randolph County Genealogical Society for fourteen years and is also a past editor of the Guilford Genealogist.  He was Piedmont Director of the North Carolina Genealogical Society in the late 1990s and early 2000s. He currently serves as Editor of the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal and Clan Genealogist for Clan MacRae Society of North America.

Courtesy of the N.C. Dept. of Cultural Resources

Today in North Carolina

Hanes Brand Began in Winston-Salem

Image from the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art

On June 12, 1886, James G. Hanes, founder of Hanes knitwear, was born in what’s now Winston-Salem.

Following his 1909 graduation from the University of North Carolina , Hanes returned to Forsyth County and joined his father’s textile business, which was then burdened by a heavy debt. Hanes stewarded the company through a five-year recovery and renamed the business Hanes Hosiery Mills. He was rewarded for his diligent and skillful leadership by being elected president of the company in 1917.

In the 1920s, Hanes was determined to shift the focus of the company from men’s hosiery to women’s garments and established the Hanes Dye & Finishing Company to bleach, dye and finish cotton products. By 1938, the company had grown to become the world’s largest producer of women’s seamless nylon hosiery.

In addition to his work with the family business, Hanes served on the board of directors for the Norfolk and Western Railway, the New York City-based Savoy Hotel and the Wachovia Bank and Trust Company. He also took an active role in local government, most notably serving for four years as mayor of Winston-Salem and for 22 years on Forsyth County’s Board of Commissioners.

He died in 1972.

Visit: Hanes’ home is now the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, open to visitors Tuesday through Sunday.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts and culture, visit Cultural Resources online. To receive these updates automatically each day, subscribe by email using the box on the right and follow us on Facebook,Twitter and Pinterest.

Happy 40th NC Room

June 1975 was not only a time of leisure suits, disco dancing and box office top dog, Benji, it was the North Carolina Room’s time to debut at the Central Library. Local and state dignitaries and citizens gathered on June 15, 1975 to celebrate a new space dedicated to local history and genealogy. Anne Correll presided over the celebration as the room’s first head librarian. The Room was relocated twice in the building in the following years and now it operates out of a temporary location on the second floor of the Government Center until a brand new space is opened in the renovated library.

We thank every person and organization who has spent time exploring our resources in the room and who have donated items to make the collection as strong as it is. We invite you to a birthday reception on June 15, 2015 at our current location from 11 am to 2 pm as we remember the past and dream of the future.

We hope to see you there!

Benji

Benji0000

 Winston-Salem Journal, June 16, 1975.

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